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Mission accomplished!

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Hi friends! I will be the first to admit that I have not been as good with this whole blog thing as I'd hoped I would be. It's been entirely too long since I last posted -- but the good news is, a LOT has happened during that time! Let me catch you up. My last post was a bittersweet one, lamenting that my effort to crowdsource the publication of my first novel through Inkshares did not pan out. I said then that where a door closes, a window open -- and boy, I had no idea the truth of that statement. I was disappointed, but nowhere near giving up. No, that point came nearly a year later after querying fifty agents and receiving (or not receiving, as was the case with the vast majority) fifty rejections. After being turned down by an indie publisher who sent me an error-riddled note recommending that I have my book professionally edited (oh, the irony), I realized it was probably time to step back and reassess my approach. I looked at the calendar and realized the September #PitM

When a door closes, a window opens

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Sharing the update I sent to my supporters on Inkshares this morning: Hello friends! Update for you on Charlie’s Mirror: 5 days out from the January 23 deadline, and unfortunately I am not going to reach the 750 pre-order threshold. But don’t worry, this is not the end. A literary agent has expressed interest in the book and is currently reviewing the manuscript – a HUGE step in the direction of traditional publishing! I’m feeling optimistic! And what the heck – if that doesn’t work out, I can always give Inkshares another try; I’ve learned so much during this process. So what happens next? You, dear supporters, will get your money back soon after the funding period ends on January 23. They say “immediately,” so I would expect to see your refund within a day or two. Then, follow me on Facebook (Brenda Lyne Books), Twitter (@akabrendalyne), and/or Instagram (@akabrendalyne) to keep up with all the latest on my journey to becoming a published author! From the very bottom of m

Brenda Lyne is on the air!

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YOU GUYS. Check it out. I'm on TV!! Follow this link to see my story! -->  CTN Journal: Aspiring Author

Writing is hard. Please love my story!

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The hardest part of being a writer is being so, so proud of your work and realizing that not everybody feels the same way you do.  No question. I've been participating in short story competitions just to keep me writing and keep me fresh. It's a fun exercise, but it's rather frustrating to keep submitting what I believe to be fabulous stories -- and they don't make the cut. Case in point: this 250-word piece of flash fiction awesomeness. It didn't make the top ten in a competition, but I think it's one of my better pieces. It was inspired by a short story I wrote in a writing class last fall. Thought I'd share it with you. Prompt: Fantasy/fairy tale that had to include the action of delivering a letter, and the word "parched." Enjoy! ----‐----- Obituary of a Tyrant Dracorian, Lucius Passed into eternal damnation on the eighth day of the sixth month, aged eighty-five years. He was preceded in death by his reluctant wife, Queen Alexandra of Azuria. H

Being an author on social media

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I'm a marketer. While my experience may lie more on the traditional side, I have a decent basic understanding of social media and its importance in the marketing mix -- especially for those brands that sell direct to consumer. I get the different audiences that use the different platforms: LinkedIn for business, Instagram for the more visual set, Facebook for the groups that skew older, and Twitter for...well, just about everyone. I've been working on building my author platform on Twitter and Facebook for the better part of a year. Facebook I get; I'm a prolific user in my personal life, and have great engagement. Probably I have my kids to thank for that. :) Twitter, though...I cannot figure Twitter out. I abandoned my personal account a while ago because I couldn't get any traction, and because it was becoming a toxically political place. But I heard at a conference that Twitter is the first place agents are going to go looking for an author; so I reluctantly set

Working for a living.

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I have many sayings in life, but one of my favorites is this: No 18-year-old knows what they want to do for the rest of their life. I recognize that there are always going to be exceptions to the rule. But, generally speaking, expecting a fresh-out-of-high-school college freshman to choose a major -- and therefore decide what they want to be when they grow up -- is an awful lot to ask. I was one of those rare ones who knew from about the age of fifteen what I wanted to be when I grew up: I wanted to be a writer. Specifically, a fiction novelist. I wanted to follow in the footsteps of my hero, Stephen King -- and make a living writing and telling stories. A noble goal, to be sure. But, because I was only 18 and completely clueless, I didn't have the foggiest idea how to make that happen. I didn't know where to find the resources that could help me. Plus, an English degree didn't seem super...well, practical. I looked at the profession of "writing&quo

A Few Irons in the Proverbial Fire

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I mentioned in a previous post that the hardest part about the publishing process is the waiting. Especially for someone like me, who was not blessed with a plethora of patience. I realized that I didn't tell you what I'm waiting on! It's exciting, Being Brenda Lyne. And also excruciating. I have a couple irons in the fire at the moment. The first is this: two weekends ago I attended the Wordsmith Conference, hosted by the Loft Literary Center. When I registered for the conference several months prior (back in like July) I decided to pay extra for a consultation with an agent. I figured what the heck, maybe I'll learn something. Between the time I signed up and conference time, I finished the CHARLIE'S MIRROR manuscript and started querying agents. I debated sending one to the agent I'd signed up to meet with at the conference, then decided what the heck. So I did that, back in early October. She came back about two weeks later with a standard rejection email. T